The Railing Shop on 216-218 Bates needs some love and some new life in her old bones.  We want to create content that helps share the journey of bringing this old brick building back to life in the Dayton's Bluff Neighborhood in St. Paul, MN.

216-218 Bates Ave St. Paul,  MN  

216-218 Bates Ave St. Paul,  MN

 

 

A Brief History

The Schornstein Garage at 216-218 Bates Avenue is comprised of two buildings; the two-story building was constructed in 1886 and the one-story section constructed in 1912. Both buildings were covered with aluminum siding. The carriage doors have been replaced with a sectional, overhead-opening garage door. The lower window of 216 is covered, and the upper windows currently have two-pane sliders with decorative shutters. 218 has two openings on the primary facade, both with decorative shutters; one fixed-pane window and one glazed paneled door. 218 also has a sectional overhead garage door on the north elevation. Per the inventory form, the buildings are categorized as non-contributing.


As evidenced in older photographs, 216 Bates Avenue was a two-story masonry load-bearing building with a flat roof behind a low parapet. Historically, the building had a brick exterior with two shallow, corbelled cornices and shallow corbelled brackets at each end. The two, second-story windows were double-hung, four-over-four, and the left (north) side first story window was a fixed four-light window with a two-light transom above. The windows have hidden lintels and rowlock sills. Double carriage doors occupy the right side first story opening. The doors were rail and stile, with diagonal bead-board panels. The left door had a secondary service door in it. The lower corners of the automotive entry had cast-iron, bullet-shaped corner protectors. The 218 Bates portion of the Schornstein Garage is a one-story brick building that was constructed for use as an automotive garage. The exterior is brick and appears to be whitewashed in older photographs. It had a simple, two-course corbelled cornice, and the one partially-visible window has a hidden lintel and a rowlock cornice. The historic fenestration is unknown.